Communications strategies and resources

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Comms strategies with Erick

   1. Instagram
       a. Can be used from a desktop if you inspect the code
       b. First place to post new photos
       c. Photography basics
           i. Framing a shot
           ii. Capturing facial expressions, candid shots
       d. Bios are where people include links
           i. Services are emerging to expand from an IG bio link to an expansive list of further links
   2. Decentralizing content admin
       a. Lots of free tools obviate traditional skill barriers (eg graphic design)
           i. Tweetdeck, Hootsuite for scheduling posts
           ii. Photo editing
               1. Canva
               2. Background Eraser
               3. Spark Post for (even animated) flyers
           iii. Life Hacker for video tutorials
           iv. Google “how to…” anything to find tutorials
           v. Repost to allow cross-platform replication of photo & text content
           vi. Photo grid for collages
           vii. Advice Animals for memes
           viii. Snapseed
           ix. Adobe Clip for basic video editing
       b. Leverage young people who wield native tool literacy
       c. User-centered perspective; consider how you use social media
           i. Do you like things that are aesthetically engaging?
           ii. Or do you just support cool orgs doing good work?
       d. How to empower folks without requiring / re-introducing centralization
       e. On the other hand, it’s worth pitching to funders requests for support for a professional comms staffer to add focus & coordination
   3. Competing platforms
       a. Instagram: visual storytelling; skews younger
           i. Especially engaging signs at a rally
           ii. Volunteers in action
       b. Facebook: deeper dives; skews older
       c. Twitter: 
       d. Meet people where they’re at
           i. Snapchat: ephemeral chat
           ii. Dischord?
           iii. Twitch: gamers
   4. General principles
       a. Storytelling is a basic skill applicable across platforms
       b. Get an account on all services, even if you don’t use it—if only to keep someone else from claiming your brand / handle / preferred profile name
       c. Don’t be afraid to replicate content; a photo with text is the most basic content and is worth sharing more than once
       d. Beyond posting content: organize
           i. Recruit supporters on each platform. Share content with them. Ask them to share
       e. Phones are often easier to use than desktop platforms
           i. Adobe apps on desktops are pricey…but their mobile apps are remarkably sophisticated and generally free. It requires an account, but that’s free
       f. Platforms will offer suggestions based on your behavior, not your preferences
           i. If you like posts on topics x y z, that’s what you’ll see…
           ii. …even if those interactions are (to you) more or less random
   5. FB 
       a. real names policy; how to craft & share content without using your personal profile / name
           i. Even branded pages are associated with individual pages
           ii. FB is moving into a more (not less) accountable model in the face of concerns re content moderation
       b. Paid promotion should focus on your original content (eg a blog post responding to a policy proposal)
           i. Running a consistent paid promotion can diminish the visibility of your content; FB trains account holders to become paid customers
   6. Hardware
       a. A tripod + a grip (some of which can swivel from portrait to landscape) can turn any phone into an effective video capture device
       b. Battery chargers can liberate your use of mobile